Global Development Institute Blog

Global Development Institute Blog

We’re the Global Development Institute at The University of Manchester: where critical thinking meets social justice.

Scaling up participation: conference

Scaling up participation: conference

Professor Diana Mitlin, Professor of Global Urbanism, Global Development Institute

How can participation be scaled up to make an impact that has relevance at the scale required? What are the challenges that must be tackled in terms of exclusion of those who have the lowest incomes and are the most vulnerable? What is the contribution of the state, and how can a supportive response be catalysed? How significant is devolution and subsidiarity? And how can we shift from the neighbourhood to city-wide interventions, inclusive, multi-sectoral and multi-scalar?

A conference at the University of Manchester on June 12-13 2019 offers a unique insight into these and related challenges. Professors Victoria Beard, Vanessa Watson, Gabriella Carolini and Gianpaolo Baiochhi will debate with NGO experts, Somsook Boonyabancha (Asian Coalition for Housing Rights), Kaustuv Bandyopadhyay (Participatory Research in Asia), Carlos Revilla (ADD, Bolivia) and Jhono Bennett (1to1, South Africa). The experiences of SDI affiliated-social movements from Kenya and Zimbabwe will add the grassroots perspective to the discussions. And their African knowledge will be enhanced by histories of social movements from Rosario in Argentina. read more…

From the Classroom to Cape Town, HRD’s Fieldwork Visits to South Africa

From the Classroom to Cape Town, HRD’s Fieldwork Visits to South Africa

Dr Rory Stanton, Programme Co-Director, MSc in Human Resource Development (International Development)

“Welcome to the Mother City” is the slogan that greets you as you make your way through Cape Town International Airport upon arrival. For those of us who have been lucky enough to have travelled there as part of the MSc in Human Resource Development (International Development) programme at the University of Manchester, we can safely say that we have always been very well looked after.

Situated at the southern tip of Africa and beside the impressive Table Mountain, Cape Town has generously hosted HRD students from the university for the last two years as they learn first-hand about some of the workplace realities faced by those running NGOs, local government institutes and departments, consultancy companies, as well as private businesses.

read more…

International development’s had its time

International development’s had its time

Dr Rory Horner, Senior Lecturer in Globalisation and Political Economy and ESRC Future Research Leader, Global Development Institute

Often associated with a North-South binary, the term ‘international development’ seems increasingly inappropriate for encompassing the various actors, processes and major challenges with which our world currently engages. In a new paper in Progress in Human Geography, I argue that global development holds potential as an emerging paradigm better fitted to the early 21st century, but critical attention is required as to what that may involve. read more…

Debating the new geographies of development: the 2019 Development and Change Forum Issue

Debating the new geographies of development: the 2019 Development and Change Forum Issue

Dr Rory Horner and Professor David Hulme

Since 1990 the global map of development has shifted from one of “divergence, big time” to “converging divergence”. This involves some converging in development indicators between North and South in aggregate, alongside divergence or growing inequality within many countries. To better capture the nature of contemporary challenges, this means we need to go beyond the traditional notion of ‘international’ development to consider a different form of ‘global’ development in relation to the whole world.

In a nutshell, this was our argument in an article in Development and Change, prompting the editors to commission 8 critical commentaries by a variety of leading thinkers on development. The whole issue is open access, but here’s our summary of the key questions and issues that were raised. read more…

BAPA+40: Learning from the Global South

BAPA+40: Learning from the Global South

One word to describe the current state of multilateralism is “contested”. Within existing international institutions, like the United Nations, debates on global governance reform have been politicised to a point of gridlock. New multilateral institutions, like the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank or the New Development Bank, have been created, but mainly because emerging economies were dissatisfied with their lack of voice in the Bretton Woods institutions. Increased nationalist and populist movements around the world, as well as rivalries among rising powers, have added to these contestations.

Despite these trends, global cooperation has achieved major milestones recently. In 2015, the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and the Paris Agreement on climate change were launched. Since then, countries have translated these frameworks into concrete policies to benefit their people, often in new forms of collaboration across governments and with non-government actors.

Against this background of “contested cooperation”, the global development community meets for the Second High-Level United Nations Conference on South-South Cooperation (BAPA+40) from 20-22 March 2019. This is not another UN conference where developing countries gather to present their demands towards richer countries. Instead, the conference is a celebration of solidarity among developing countries. More than 40 years after a landmark UN conference on the Buenos Aires Plan of Action (BAPA), developing countries showcase their achievements in cooperating and learning from each other. read more…

Fieldwork in Cape Town South Africa: our experience Development Informatics group 2019

Fieldwork in Cape Town South Africa: our experience Development Informatics group 2019

Jody-kay Jackson (ICTs for Development MSc) & Raghav Mutneja (Management and Information Systems: Change and Development MSc)

Fieldwork is an essential part of the Management and Information Systems: Change and Development and ICTs for Development master’s programs and this year, the students got to visit the lovely city of Cape Town in The Republic of South Africa. The 10-day trip was full of excitement, activities, learning, new experiences and of course, a nice opportunity for all of us to get away from the chilling weather in Manchester. And South Africa greeted us all with nice and warm sunshine. read more…

Global Development Institute Merit Awards

Global Development Institute Merit Awards

The Global Development Institute Merit Awards provide six full scholarships for academically excellent professionals studying a GDI campus-based master’s course commencing in September 2019. The scholarship covers the tuition fees, living expenses, flights to the UK and visa costs.

The Global Development Institute is where critical thinking meets social justice. Researchers at the Global Development Institute are addressing some of the biggest challenges the world faces, from inequality and the politics of development to globalisation. We strive to address specific problems and make an impact in the real world. Cutting-edge insights from our research are incorporated in our postgraduate teaching and many of our 10,000 alumni become development leaders. For the last 60 years, The University of Manchester has been at the forefront of Development Studies and The Global Development Institute continues to drive forward new ideas promoting sustainable development and social justice for all.

For the next academic year we’re able to offer six fully funded scholarships for resident citizens of Ghana, Kenya, Zambia and Zimbabwe, who have not previously studied outside Africa. read more…

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