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Critical visions of development from the Global Development Institute: Uniting the strengths of IDPM and BWPI.

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Booking now open: Development Studies Association conference 27-29th June 2018

Booking now open: Development Studies Association conference 27-29th June 2018

Academics from the Global Development Institute are convening a number of panels and giving a lot of papers at the annual Development Studies Association conference taking place 27-29th June at The University of Manchester. This year’s theme will be Global Inequalities and will challenge the traditional geographies of development, and demand investigation of the power relations that generate wealth and poverty within and between countries and regions. Conference panels will also emphasise the many dimensions of inequality, including gender, class, climate, race and ethnicity, region, nationality, citizenship status, age, (dis)ability, sexuality, and religion and the ways these reinforce or counteract each other. To see all the panels and papers visit DSA website.

Register for the conference

Below is the full list of panels and papers being delivered by researchers from The University of Manchester. For full details of each session, click on the title. read more…

Rana Plaza: Five years on

Rana Plaza: Five years on

Four years ago, our institute marked the first anniversary of the Rana Plaza collapse which claimed more than 1,100 lives. Professor Stephanie Barrientos from the Global Development Institute and Rosey Hurst (the founder and director of Impactt which works with organisations to improve working conditions in their supply chain) asked whether the world has since changed for garment workers in Bangladesh.

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Disability, poverty, and technology in Uganda

Disability, poverty, and technology in Uganda

Dr Gindo Tampubolon, Lecturer in Poverty, Global Development Institute

Developing countries are often marked by spatial disparity with the centre hoarding political influence, wealth and services. Increasingly they are also marred by neglect of disability with very little known about its distribution and consequences. Here new evidence on spatial disparity in disability and poverty is shown using the new Uganda Demographic & Health Survey 2016 released early this year.

The survey collected information on six domains of disability following the UN recommended instruments, the Washington Group measure of disability. The six domains are hearing, seeing, walking or climbing steps, remembering or concentrating, self-caring, and communicating. In each domain people reported whether they faced no difficulty, some difficulty, a lot of difficulty or completely unable to perform it. I summarise the report of 46,034 Ugandans aged 15 and older on a map. The map showed the South Central region (encircling Kampala) has a low percentage of people with some disability as rendered with a lighter shade of green whereas Kigezi in the far south west is home to the highest percentage of people reporting some disability. Disability like any other disadvantages has a spatial character. read more…

Addressing global inequalities: new ideas for moving forward

Addressing global inequalities: new ideas for moving forward

Phuong Nguyen, Master of Development Studies, President of the Graduate Organisation of Development Students (GOODS) at the University of Melbourne, Australia

Are global inequalities growing or diminishing? With the rise of new global powers, are the dimensions of inequalities shifting across borders, becoming more complex than ever? As a development practitioner and a critical social scientist, have you yourself done anything that – even with good intentions – reinforced structural inequalities in society?

Over the three days of the New Geographies of Global Inequalities and Social Justice Conference at the University of Melbourne, I had the chance to engage with academics, activists and practitioners from around the world, whose brilliant ideas and scholarship have enlightened me in my quest to answer some of these questions. For me three themes emerged from the papers presented. read more…

Community Contracting: together, we build our future

Community Contracting: together, we build our future

Kani Ming Chu Lam

“We are homeless, but not hopeless.” said proudly the youth representative of National Slum Dwellers Federation of Uganda (NSDFU), Jinja region, on the first day we met during an introductory section with the federation members. This marked the beginning of an unforgettable and inspiring 10-day fieldwork in Uganda – a highlight of my one-year International Development master’s programme.

My pathway, Poverty, Inequality and Development, spent 8 days in Jinja, the second largest region in Uganda, and worked mainly with NSDFU-Jinja and its supporting national NGO, ACTogether. With their kind assistance, we carried out research on participation and empowerment in slum upgrading, focusing on four key strands of NSDFU’s work: enumeration and profiling, savings groups, projects and livelihoods. read more…

Letter to a prospective phd student

Letter to a prospective phd student

I write in anticipation of your imminent email asking me to be your PhD supervisor. Firstly, I am flattered that you have chosen to approach me out of the blue, I look forward to hearing more about your proposed research. However, I receive many approaches each year as my institution – sensibly – asks that each applicant have agreed a supervisor prior to formally applying. Many of these approaches make similar mistakes that I would like you to avoid. So, before you do fatefully press send, I’d like to caution you first against making some common mistakes: read more…

New book from Richard Duncombe: Digital Technology For Agricultural and Rural Development in the Global South

New book from Richard Duncombe: Digital Technology For Agricultural and Rural Development in the Global South

Global Development Institute researcher Dr Richard Duncombe is the editor of a new book sharing research and practice on current trends in digital technology for agricultural and rural development in the Global South.

The population of the Global South is growing rapidly. As populations grow so do requirements for food and nutrition. Improvements in agricultural productivity and sustainability are essential conditions for development to take place, in this respect. Some regions of the Global South have seen greater success than others in terms of agricultural growth. Low agricultural productivity in the Global South can be attributed to lack of knowledge of up-to-date technologies and practices, as well as issues such as climate change. read more…

In conversation: Khalid Nadvi and Rory Horner

In conversation: Khalid Nadvi and Rory Horner

Global Development Institute academics, Khalid Nadvi and Rory Horner discuss the growing body of research which points to the ‘Rise of the South’ and the growth of South–South trade. Rory and Khalid consider the implications of the shifting dynamics of global trade and the greater prominence of Southern actors for the conceptualization of global value chains and global production networks.

Khalid Nadi and Rory Horner recently guest edited a special issue of Global Networks which looked at ‘global production networks and the new contours of development in the global south’.

read more…

Bringing practical human resource management insight to students.

Bringing practical human resource management insight to students.

The University of Manchester’s Global Development Institute offers a range of taught master’s programmes focusing on human resource management, organisational change and managing and delivering development projects.

The master’s programme includes fieldwork and visits to organisations as well as guest lectures providing students with an opportunity to gain insights into practice-focused human resource and international management.

As an adjunct to the Organisational Behaviour course unit and part of the Study Enhancement Programme of the MSc HRM programme, guest lecture sessions provide students with an opportunity to gain insights into practice. Humayoun Akhtar from World Pay presented human resource and international management challenges facing the multinational UK-USA managed company. Akhtar linked Human Resource theories and practice through issues and examples from the international digital payment organisation. The session also included reflective learning time through group discussion and Q&A.

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