Global Development Institute Blog

Global Development Institute Blog

Critical visions of development from the Global Development Institute: Uniting the strengths of IDPM and BWPI.

Find out more
Save our chocolate!

Save our chocolate!

Dr Judith Krauss, Lecturer in Environment and Climate Change 

pic 1Can I ask you a question? Do you like chocolate? If your answer is ‘yes’, as for 100% of my focus-group and public-engagement participants, you may be interested to know that the people manufacturing your favourite treats are not entirely sure where your fix’s key ingredient will come from four years from now.

Six years ago, projections that cocoa demand would outstrip supply by about 25% by 2020 began circulating. Factors contributing to the shortage concerns include: cocoa cultivation’s lacking attractiveness for younger generations given decades of low prices, productivity-maximising practices degrading limited production surfaces and the unknown variable of climate change, as well as only a handful of companies controlling the marketplace. The impending doom has prompted the chocolate sector to begin engaging with ‘cocoa sustainability’ to address these issues and safeguard its key ingredient’s long-term availability.

The bad news: nobody quite knows how to do that.

The good news: chocolate-industry actors have begun engaging in various fora and initiatives to address a problem together which is too monumental for any one stakeholder to tackle alone. One such forum, bringing together diverse chocolate-industry actors from civil society, public sector and private sector, is the World Cocoa Conference (WCC), taking place in the Dominican Republic from 22 to 25 May 2016. Stakeholders from all facets of the cocoa sector have congregated to discuss ‘Building bridges between producers and consumers’, with a view to ‘connecting the whole of the value chain’. read more…

The Global Development Institute is Hiring

The Global Development Institute is Hiring

We have big ambitions at the GDI and to make them happen, we need the best research and teaching staff.  If you have an outstanding track record and a commitment to social justice, then please come and join us.

Click on the job titles for more information:

Lecturer/Senior Lecturer in Environment and Development

Permanent. Closing date: 15/03/2018

 

Lecturer/Senior Lecturer In Technology, Labour And Production

Permanent. Closing date: 15/03/2018

 

The University of Manchester Presidential Academic Fellowship: Industry 4.0 (School of Environment, Education and Development)

Permanent from September 2018. Closing date: 03/04/2018

Is Europe really being ‘invaded’ by refugees?

Is Europe really being ‘invaded’ by refugees?

By Gabriele Restelli 

Monday, June 27th. Beirut, 5.00 AM and the electricity is gone. It is a sweltering 35 degrees even at dawn. Right when I’m thinking to just get up, the phone starts ringing. It is Juliana, our Security Advisor, and if she calls out of office hours, it is usually not good news. She’s informing that shelling just started next to the Syrian border. We have to get ready for a potential new influx of five to ten thousand refugees. It’s going to be a long day.

read more…

Bina Agarwal: Don’t follow the fashion. Challenge it.

Bina Agarwal: Don’t follow the fashion. Challenge it.

In the last year, Professor Bina Agarwal has won three major international prizes for her work on gender, agriculture and development: the Agropolis Fondation Louis Malassis International Scientific Prize, the French Ordre du Mérite Agricole, and finally the Balzan Prize.

To mark this achievement, GDI’s executive director David Hulme recently presented Bina with a token of appreciation ahead of a GDI public lecture by Vijay Joshi.  He remarked, “Getting one of these prizes in an academic career is excellent. Getting two is pretty much unheard of. Getting three in the same year is an achievement I’ve never seen before!”

read more…

Voices from Accra

Voices from Accra

Introducing Old Fadama

This article is based on Laura v. Puttkamer’s Master’s dissertation from August 2017, with a summary of research results, drawing on interviews with local experts, who at their wish remain anonymous.

Old Fadama or ‘Sodom and Gomorrah’, as it is also known in Accra, is one of Africa’s and certainly Ghana’s largest informal settlement or slum. Roughly 200,000 people live near the Korle Lagoon and its tributary rivers in what is now Accra’s city centre. The settlement has been subject to various eviction attempts ever since its existence.

read more…

How I marvelled at Black Panther’s reimagining of Africa

How I marvelled at Black Panther’s reimagining of Africa

Edward Ademolu, PhD Researcher, Global Development Institute 

Watching Marvel’s highly anticipated comic-book film adaptation, Black Panther, was no ordinary tried and tested cinematic experience. Much like the unapologetic showmanship, flamboyance and atmospheric idiosyncrasies of Sunday service black congregational worship, the cinema metamorphosised beyond its remnants of unswept popcorn kernels and sticky milkshake residue into an augmented space. It became a “mega-church” sanctuary of spiritual catharsis –with all the impassioned and melodic trimmings of Afro-Pentecostalism.

But, make no mistake, this was not the time nor place for solemn contemplation or confessing past transgressions – but an opportunity for continental Africans and diaspora to offload socially sanctioned climactic expressions of individual and collective excitement and expectations, as well as lip-bitten anxieties about a fictionalised Africa. read more…

Why We Lie About Aid – in defence of hopeful pragmatism

Why We Lie About Aid – in defence of hopeful pragmatism

Pablo Yanguas, Research Fellow, Effective States and Inclusive Development

Why We Lie About Aid is a book born out of bafflement, and not a little bit of frustration. 

For a long time now I have been baffled about the apparent disconnect between how we – the public in donor countries – talk about aid as if it was solely about charity and poverty. I have seen friends, family and colleagues exposed time and again to donation drives, famine celebrities, and NGOs whose messaging centred on destitution. Or alternatively they have been told that aid is a waste of money, a useless or even corrupt tool for fattening experts and dictators. Both narratives stand in marked contrast with my research and consulting work, where I have encountered policymakers, public servants, civil society advocates, and development practitioners tirelessly working to set up and improve the institutions that can guarantee more effective states, fairer markets, and freer societies. I can only understand development – and, by extension, development assistance – as a political task. And yet that view has been all but absent from public debate, even among those most in favour of international solidarity.  read more…

Call for papers: Development Studies Association conference 27-29th June 2018

Call for papers: Development Studies Association conference 27-29th June 2018

Academics from the Global Development Institute are helping to convene a number of panels at the annual Development Studies Association conference taking place 27-29th June at The University of Manchester. This year’s theme will be Global Inequalities and will challenge the traditional geographies of development, and demand investigation of the power relations that generate wealth and poverty within and between countries and regions. Conference panels will also emphasise the many dimensions of inequality, including gender, class, climate, race and ethnicity, region, nationality, citizenship status, age, (dis)ability, sexuality, and religion and the ways these reinforce or counteract each other.

There is a call for papers for all panels at the DSA Conference; visit the DSA website for more information. The deadline for submitting papers is 9 March. read more…

Sign up for Global Development Institute mailing list

* = required field

powered by MailChimp!

Archive of posts

February 2018
M T W T F S S
« Jan    
 1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
262728  
%d bloggers like this: