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Global Development Institute Blog

Critical visions of development from the Global Development Institute: Uniting the strengths of IDPM and BWPI.

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Corruption and innovation in European regions: building on the shoulders of giants

Corruption and innovation in European regions: building on the shoulders of giants

by Gindo Tampubolon

Corruption or poor quality governance is inimical to wealth creation. Corruption imposes disincentives to economic activity via two channels. First, a corrupt government is unattractive to people outside its pool of cronies and connections (“crons & cons”), prohibiting outside talents to replenish the governance structure. Second, it imposes disincentives to essentially risky innovative activities (bringing new products or services to the market cf Schumpeter 1942). The risk for the inventor is initially set by an unfair condition put in place to the advantage of the pool of crons and cons (e.g. licences that prioritise them and not awarded on merit). Also inventors are under a shadow of threat: extraction of their innovation rewards as arbitrary rents. Thus would be inventors shrink. A variant of Acemoglu-Robinson hypothesis follows i.e. corruption hinders technological innovation.

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Call for papers – Public Service Ethics, Values and Spirituality

Call for papers – Public Service Ethics, Values and Spirituality

Call for Papers: Public Service Ethics, Values and Spirituality: Challenges and Opportunities for Developing and Transitional Countries

Special issue in: Public Administration and Development (PAD)

Special Issue Guest Editors

Dr Farhad Hossain (Corresponding Editor), The University of Manchester, United Kingdom

Dr Anthony Sumnaya Kumasey, University of Professional Studies, Accra, Ghana

Dr Christopher J. Rees, The University of Manchester, United Kingdom

Dr Aminu Mamman, The University of Manchester, United Kingdom

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Gender and environmental relations in the disposal of menstrual hygiene products

Gender and environmental relations in the disposal of menstrual hygiene products

By Mariana Lopez, PhD researcher, Global Development Institute

A recent study in rural Jharkhand, India found that 17% of the women dumped their sanitary pads in the same pond where they bathe. “If you search the bottom of the lake, you will find the whole bed covered with napkins.”

Research has been conducted on various dimensions of menstrual hygiene, including: the origins of menstrual taboos; health issues associated with tampons; the effects of accessibility to sanitary products on girls’ education, hygiene and rights and the dynamics behind the advertisements of menstrual hygiene products. However, an aspect that remains understudied are the effects that these products have on the environment and on the livelihoods of waste pickers.

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DSA2018: Development, global inequalities, and the long histories of social injustice: meeting Brazil’s Dilma Rousseff ahead of the DSA 2018 Conference

DSA2018: Development, global inequalities, and the long histories of social injustice: meeting Brazil’s Dilma Rousseff ahead of the DSA 2018 Conference

The Development Studies Association Annual Conference is being hosted by the Global Development Institute from 27-29th June. The conference will focus on inequalities. Ahead of the conference, we are running a series of blogs from attendees looking at the key issues and debates around inequalities.

By Dr Chris Lyon, Research Associate

Shortly before being removed in a process widely considered to be a coup, and which was quietly but effectively supported by the United States, a left-leaning President of Brazil passionately denounced the agents of the coup thus: “The democracy they seek is the democracy of privilege, the democracy of intolerance and hatred […] It is the democracy of the national and international monopolies, a democracy that can fight against the people”.

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DSA2018: Welcome to the Development Studies Association conference

DSA2018: Welcome to the Development Studies Association conference

Welcome from the Global Development Institute at The University of Manchester

We are very pleased and honoured to welcome you all to the 2018 Development Studies Association Annual Conference here at The University of Manchester. We are delighted to host this conference focused on global inequalities, a theme which is one of five research beacons of The University of Manchester. Development studies has a long tradition at Manchester, with 2018 marking our 60th anniversary as a university department. We have recently combined the strengths of our Institute for Development Policy and Management and Brooks World Poverty Institute to form the Global Development Institute as part of the university’s continued commitment to and promotion of development studies. We are pleased to continue our long and productive relationship with the Development Studies Association in a year in which it also celebrates an anniversary – 40 years. read more…

Beta release: Visualising social assistance in Latin America

Beta release: Visualising social assistance in Latin America

Professor Armando Barrientos, Professor of Poverty and Social Justice

Since the turn of the century low and middle income countries have implemented programmes providing regular transfers to families in poverty with the objective of strengthening their capacity to exit poverty.

The theory behind antipoverty transfer programmes is that stabilising and enhancing household income will enable participants to improve their nutrition, ensure investment in children’s schooling and health, and help overcome economic and social exclusion.

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Watch: 60 years of Development Studies at Manchester

Watch: 60 years of Development Studies at Manchester

For the last 60 years, The University of Manchester has been at the forefront of Development Studies. To mark the occasion, we’ve produced a short documentary telling the story of the Global Development Institute and its forebears.

Narrated by Professors Uma Kothari, David Hulme and Diana Mitlin, the documentary explores how the Institute has progressed from providing informal training for post-colonial administrators, to establishing Manchester as an influential centre post-graduate teaching and research.

The documentary also charts the recognition of Development Studies as a distinct academic discipline, which the establishment of the Development Studies Association (DSA) in 1978 helped to formalise.

It seems appropriate that with Manchester celebrating 60 years of Development Studies and the DSA its 40th anniversary, the annual Development Studies Conference begins in Manchester. The conference will reflect on some of the progress that’s been made over time, but more importantly, will address a major global challenge – rising inequalities.

The final plenary discussion session on Friday will focus on strategies for tackling global inequality, which is a public event, open to all.  Tickets can be booked here. 

The New Geography of Deindustrialisation and the Rise of the Right

The New Geography of Deindustrialisation and the Rise of the Right

Dr Seth Schindler, Senior Lecturer in Urban Development & Transformation Global Development Institute

Donald Trump seems intent on starting a global trade war. His recent imposition of tariffs on steel and aluminium is consistent with his rambling inaugural address about “American carnage.” Trump’s narrative of industrial decline is informed by the common sense notion that developing countries have experienced economic growth at the expense of American jobs and industry. This narrative has been deeply rooted in American politics, popular media and scholarship since the late-1970s. Furthermore, it fuels populist politics in European countries that have also witnessed declining manufacturing employment such as the UK, France and Italy. The problem with this narrative is that it ignores the simple fact that deindustrialization in Latin America and Sub-Sharan Africa has been more severe than it has been in the U.S. and Europe.

Deindustrialisation in developing countries differs in important ways from the pattern observed in the OECD. Dani Rodrik refers to it as “premature” because it takes place prior to an increase in productivity in the service sector and/or wage increases. Rather than an endogenous evolution of the economy from manufacturing to services, premature deindustrialisation represents stalled development. It is largely driven by external shocks and events that local policy makers are ill-equipped to address. read more…

DSA2018: Why global inequalities?

DSA2018: Why global inequalities?

Global inequalities is the central theme of DSA2018 in Manchester, which marks the Development Studies Association’s 40th anniversary and 60 years of development studies at The University of Manchester.

Focusing on global inequalities challenges the traditional geographies of development, and demands investigation of the power relations that generate wealth and poverty within and between countries and regions. It also emphasises the many dimensions of inequality, including gender, class, climate, race and ethnicity, region, nationality, citizenship status, age, (dis)ability, sexuality, and religion and the ways these reinforce or counteract each other. read more…

DSA2018: Are Jordanian women transcending gender norms? A qualitative analysis of non-traditional work

DSA2018: Are Jordanian women transcending gender norms? A qualitative analysis of non-traditional work

By Lina Khraise

The Development Studies Association Annual Conference is being hosted by the Global Development Institute from 27-29th June. The conference will focus on inequalities. Ahead of the conference, we are running a series of blogs from attendees looking at the key issues and debates around inequalities.

Jordan has one of the lowest rates of female participation in the workforce, currently between 12 and 15 percent in the formal sector and 40 percent in the informal sector. There are many impediments to women’s economic participation. Issues of lack of childcare, transport and employer discrimination are often cited. Yet, despite improvements in social security and some labour laws, one of the most pervasive and underpinning issues is that of gender norms. While women are well educated, the societal perspective is that the main role is to become a wife and mother only, and their work is seen as temporary and even unnecessary.

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