Global Development Institute Blog

Global Development Institute Blog

We’re the Global Development Institute at The University of Manchester: where critical thinking meets social justice.

MSc Human Resource Management Enhancement Programme Webinar Hermes Airport Project, Cyprus 

MSc Human Resource Management Enhancement Programme Webinar Hermes Airport Project, Cyprus 

GDI offers a range of taught master’s programmes focusing on human resource management, organisational change, human resource development and managing and delivering development projects.

The MSc Human Resource Management programme aims to equip learners with a robust theoretical framework for careers in human resource management and at the same time to provide students with an opportunity to gain insights into practice-focused human resource practice across a wide range of management contexts and sectors.

The course has been developed to offer student engagement with a wide range of organisational contexts in the field of HR practice, with a focus on the professional, cultural and social dimensions of their experience. This engagement is achieved through a two-semester Enhancement Programme of organisation-based experiential learning experiences, including residential and day field visits to public and private sector organisations, complemented by visits to the university by experienced, organization-based HR practitioners. read more…

Should we expect a post-Covid-19 social protection epiphany in Latin America?

Should we expect a post-Covid-19 social protection epiphany in Latin America?

Armando Barrientos, Emeritus Professor of Poverty and Social Justice, Global Development Institute

Social protection has played a leading role in government responses to Covid-19. Public programmes providing income and in-kind transfers to vulnerable population groups have been strengthened and enhanced to address the effects of the pandemic.

In low and middle income countries, the expansion of social assistance provided governments with a ready-made platform to reach and support low income groups. Social assistance infrastructure – social registries, implementation agencies, and local community links – facilitated fast and effective responses to the crisis. In addition to existing conditional income transfers and social pensions, several governments in Latin America implemented temporary income transfer programmes to support workers in informal employment. In high income countries, governments mobilised support for furloughed workers and the unemployed while social assistance transfers plugged the gaps left by welfare state retrenchment. read more…

Migrant lives: living between aspirational worlds in times of (in)security and immobility

Migrant lives: living between aspirational worlds in times of (in)security and immobility

We have just launched a new master’s course on International Development: Migration, Mobility and Displacement. To coincide with this and to give students a greater idea about the course we will be sharing a series of blogs from members of our Migration, Refugees and Asylum research group.  

The first blog explores Prof Tanja Müller’s Moving the goalposts of citizenship? German business sector engagement and refugee integration project. 

Mobility is a core human endeavour which is often forgotten, but the last decade has in different ways put the limelight on movements but also immobilities. There was the visible movement of refugees from Syria that in particular in 2015 put people’s flight from devastation and their aspiration for a better future into the daily news for a while. Since February 2020, immobility has become a key news item, as Covid-19 has resulted in multiple external and internal travel restrictions, impacting the lives of internal and externals migrants in multiple ways. read more…

Webinar: an introduction to the African Cities Research Consortium

Webinar: an introduction to the African Cities Research Consortium

Catch up with our webinar which introduced the African Cities Research Consortium (ACRC) and outlined how the ACRC and its international partners is planning to tackle complex, political and systemic problems in some of Africa’s fastest-growing urban areas.

ACRC has been awarded a contract of £32 million from the UK’s Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office (FCDO) over the next 6 years. Building on the political settlements analysis established by the Effective States and Inclusive Development research centre, ARCR will adopt a city as systems approach to addressing complex urban problems. Through engaged action research we aim to catalyse progress for disadvantaged communities in a number of focus cities and beyond. read more…

The challenges and opportunities of researching migration in a pandemic

The challenges and opportunities of researching migration in a pandemic

Malte Skov and Andreina Carrillo Espinoza, PhD researchers, Global Development Institute

The global outbreak of the novel Covid-19 virus has meant that travel restrictions, as well as national, regional, and local lockdowns across the globe, pose major limitations on conducting research in the field. Human contact has been unprecedently restricted, which has resulted in new practical and ethical challenges for many researchers, not least within the field of migration.

To explore the methodological impacts of these new challenges, the Research Group on Migration, Refugees and Asylum hosted an online workshop on 13 November 2020, which brought together a group of Academics working with migration in different contexts and locations. read more…

Chronic poverty and inequality in Uganda. The last mile?

Chronic poverty and inequality in Uganda. The last mile?

Gindo Tampubolon, Lecturer in Poverty, Global Development Institute

Global development aims to eradicate poverty in this decade. The task, according to the latest figure from the Uganda Bureau of Statistics, involves 21.4 per cent of Ugandans living in poverty. And according to the World Bank (Poverty Assessment Report 2016), nine out of ten poor people live in rural places and two-thirds in the North and Eastern regions. But success in this task is hindered by a lack of knowledge on why families stay poor or what predicts chronic poverty. Since the turn of the century, few studies have modelled chronic poverty and its key predictors, those focusing on the same families that are extremely poor in consecutive times of observations. Without such knowledge, a world without poverty will remain elusive. read more…

 Just Give Money to the Poor: The Development Revolution from the Global South

 Just Give Money to the Poor: The Development Revolution from the Global South

In 2010 Joseph Hanlon, Armando Barrientos and David Hulme published ‘Just Give Money to the Poor: The Development Revolution from the Global South’. The book concisely summarises the evidence of the benefits of cash transfers. Its conclusion that both donors and governments should focus more on putting money in the hand of people living in poverty was influential at the time, and continues to attract plaudits ten years on. The following blog post by Armando Barrientos in 2010 summarises the key arguments: read more…

After UNAMID: Who will offer protection to civilians and the displaced in Darfur?

After UNAMID: Who will offer protection to civilians and the displaced in Darfur?

Tanja Müller, Professor of Political Sociology, Global Development Institute

On 31 December 2020, United Nations–African Union Mission in Darfur’s (UNAMID) mandate came to an end. While it will take until 30 June for all UNAMID staff to have left Sudan, the mission no longer has the mandate to intervene in the complex scenario of Darfur.

The decision by the UN Security Council to bring the mission to a close was met with various protests across the Darfur region, as many people fear a security vacuum. Indeed, already a number of attacks against civilians have reportedly occurred since New Year’s Day in Darfur, while militias have besieged one of the UNAMID sites in Central Darfur with reportedly the intention of looting the building. As national security forces of the new Sudanese government have in previous months failed to protect civilians from attacks, their fears seem more than justified. read more…

In Conversation with Chrissie Wellington OBE

In Conversation with Chrissie Wellington OBE

In this special podcast we sat down for a chat with Chrissie Wellington OBE, the 2020 recipient of The University of Manchester Outstanding Alumni Award. The four-time World Ironman Champion and current Global Head of Health and Wellbeing at Parkrun, talked about her time at Manchester, what attracted her to International Development, her remarkable sporting career and why her current work is, even more so since Covid-19, so important.

Chrissie Wellington is an iconic figure in the history of triathlon. She is the only triathlete, male or female, to have won the World Ironman Championship less than a year after turning professional. She is now Global Head of Health and Wellbeing at Parkrun.

In 2001, she graduated from The University of Manchester with a master’s degree in International Development, before becoming an advisor at the UK’s Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra). While at Defra, she negotiated for the UK at the World Summit on Sustainable Development and contributed to policy development, including post-conflict environmental reconstruction and water and sanitation.

Chrissie left the UK in 2004 to work for Rural Reconstruction Nepal, where she managed a community water sanitation and health project. On her return to the UK, Chrissie not only went back to Defra but also started competing in triathlons as an amateur athlete. She won the world age group championships in September 2006 and became a professional athlete in 2007, aged 30.

Her rise was meteoric. After winning a number of triathlon races around the world, she travelled to Korea to enter her first ever Ironman triathlon- a 2.4-mile swim, a 112-mile cycle and a 26.2-mile run – and won.

Chrissie’s win in Korea secured qualification for the World Ironman Championship in Hawaii which, less than a year after turning professional, she also won – a feat described by the British Triathlon Federation as a “near impossible task”.

Domination followed. Chrissie won three consecutive world titles, and became world champion for a fourth time in 2011. She has held three world records, and two still stand eight years after her retirement: the overall ironman distance world record, and the record for the cumulative time for all Ironman-branded triathlons.

Since retiring from competing, Chrissie has published two books, including her 2012 Sunday Times bestselling autobiography A Life Without Limits.

She is now Global Head of Health and Wellbeing at Parkrun, a charity which organises volunteer-led, free, weekly 5km events around the world. She came on board with Parkrun to develop the incredibly successful junior Parkrun series, and has since developed partnerships with the Royal College of General Practitioners as well as leading the establishment of events on the custodial estate around the UK, and overseas.

While Chrissie’s kudos as a world-class athlete opens doors, Parkrun’s chief operating officer Tom Williams says it’s not that which brings about the success she achieves: “She is a force of nature. Regardless of her achievements, her skills, her athleticism, she genuinely cares about doing things and doing the right things.

“She is not driven by financial motivation or ego – she is incredibly driven to do good things. The things we have achieved would not have happened without her.”

Chrissie Wellington graduated in 2001 with an MA in International Development. She is now the Global Head of Health and Wellbeing at Parkrun. read more…

11 GREAT master’s scholarships

11 GREAT master’s scholarships

In partnership with the British Council and the GREAT Britain Campaign, we’re offering 11 postgraduate scholarships for students from selected countries. We are pleased to offer scholarships of £10,000. Scholarships will be awarded in the form of a partial-fee waiver and there is one scholarship per country from the following countries: read more…

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