Global Development Institute Blog

Global Development Institute Blog

We’re the Global Development Institute at The University of Manchester: where critical thinking meets social justice.

From Global Britain to Little England

From Global Britain to Little England

David Hulme, Professor of Development Studies, Global Development Institute

The hypocrisy could not be greater. While Boris Johnson chaired the G7 meeting, and waxed lyrical about what the UK will contribute to reducing the impacts of Covid-19 and climate change in poorer countries, his government is systematically dismantling some of the world’s most effective poverty reduction programmes. read more…

Global value chains, private governance and multiple end-markets: insights from Kenyan leather

Global value chains, private governance and multiple end-markets: insights from Kenyan leather

Giovanni Pasquali, Research Associate, Global Development Institute

The recent growth of South-South trade and talks about the ‘great convergence’ between developing economies in the global South and developed ones has sparked increasing attention among development studies scholars. The GDI has been at the forefront of ground-breaking research evaluating the economic and social impact of this phenomenon. In particular, the work of Khalid Nadvi, Stephanie Barrientos, and Rory Horner has significantly contributed to understanding the different value chain configurations of global value chains across Northern and Southern end-markets, as well as their consequences for firms and workers. read more…

Remembering Dr Franklin Adorsu-Djentuh

Remembering Dr Franklin Adorsu-Djentuh

We are deeply saddened to share the tragic passing of our colleague and friend Dr Franklin Adorsu-Djentuh.

Franklin was a much loved member of the GDI community who spent time with us as both a PhD researcher and colleague.  He completed his PhD in 2018 looking at the role of local actors in the implementation of environmental sanitation policies in Ghana. As part of his PhD, Franklin attended the General Debate of the 73rd session of the United Nations General Assembly in New York. During his studies, Franklin worked as a Teaching Assistant and rejoined us earlier this year as a Senior Tutor teaching on a number of our courses.

He will be greatly missed by all of us. Our thoughts are with his family and friends at this difficult time. read more…

Foregone healthcare and severe food insecurity: dynamic impacts of pandemic lockdown in Uganda one year on

Foregone healthcare and severe food insecurity: dynamic impacts of pandemic lockdown in Uganda one year on

Gindo Tampubolon, Lecturer in Poverty, Global Development Institute

In response to the Covid-19 pandemic, many countries imposed severe restrictions or lockdowns on a swath of activities across society. Uganda is no exception. On 20 March 2020, a stay at home restriction was issued. The death toll is globally reported, but amongst those still living, it is not known how much suffering remains one year on: how many forego healthcare thus storing problems for their health in future and how many forego eating thus compromising their wellbeing. read more…

MSc Human Resource Management virtual meeting with the European Commission

MSc Human Resource Management virtual meeting with the European Commission

The Global Development Institute offers a range of taught master’s programmes. The MSc Human Resource Management programme aims to equip learners with a robust theoretical framework for careers in HRM and at the same time to provide students with an opportunity to gain insights into practice-focused HRM across a wide range of management contexts and sectors. The MSc HRM Enhancement Programme (HRMEP) has been developed over five years to offer closer student engagement with a wide range of organisational contexts in the field of HR practice. This year, due to the impact of Covid-19, alternative plans have been made for the enhancement programme to invite experienced HR practitioners from a wide range of organisations to engage in a series of webinars. with our HRM students on matters of HR practice.  read more…

Extreme risk makes the journey feasible

Extreme risk makes the journey feasible

We have just launched a new master’s course on International Development: Migration, Mobility and Displacement. To coincide with this and to give students a greater idea about the course we will be sharing a series of blogs from members of our Migration, Refugees and Asylum research group.  

In this blog Oliver Bakewell explores his and Caitlin Sturridge’s recent paper on Extreme Risk Makes the Journey Feasible: Decision-Making amongst Migrants in the Horn of Africa

What is the role of risk in determining how people move? We might think that the more someone knows about the risks of going on one route, the more they try to find another way. In a recent paper based on research from the Horn of Africa undertaken by the Research and Evidence Facility, Oliver Bakewell and Caitlin Sturridge, show how the extreme danger of kidnapping and extortion by traffickers opens up a narrow window of opportunity for some young Somalis to find a way to reach Europe. In the absence of any safe routes, increasing the danger has the perverse effect of making it easier for young people to go. read more…

Campaigners call for democratic approach to managing public land in Greater Manchester

Campaigners call for democratic approach to managing public land in Greater Manchester

  • Over 50 local campaign organisations, including housing and climate groups, trade unions and charities, have signed an open letter to Andy Burnham calling for a democratic approach to managing public land in Greater Manchester. 
  • The letter calls for Burnham to use his strong new mandate to follow the example of Liverpool City Region and establish a Greater Manchester Land Commission by the end of 2021. This would mean that representatives of the public, private and voluntary sectors and academia can develop proposals for how best to use public land in order to address social and environmental needs in the city region.
  • The letter follows the launch of a new report by researchers from the Universities of Manchester and Sheffield that raises concerns about the sale of Council-owned land in central Manchester.

read more…

PhD students: Getting published from a standing start

PhD students: Getting published from a standing start

By Xi Xi and Kunkanit Sutamchai

Publishing papers in journals is an effective approach to disseminate your research and communicate with peers in the research field. For a PhD student, having a paper published in an academic journal proves that you are capable to advance in your field and helps you stand out from other candidates in job applications. However, for novice researchers (like us), getting your work published for the first time might feel daunting. In this blog, we would like to share our experiences in the hope that this can be helpful for other PhD students. read more…

Oil: from a lifetime of damage-limitation to outrage

Oil: from a lifetime of damage-limitation to outrage

David Little 

Much of my career has been spent trying to find ways of reducing the environmental pollution and social damage caused by oil spills. In recent work with colleagues at Manchester and Vancouver, we have shown how prolonged public pressure brought genuine improvement to oil spill response (OSR).

But that got us thinking about oil spills and climate change (see Figure 1). In particular: “why does a low-probability risk like an oil spill attract huge public outrage, whereas climate change presents global, extreme and multifarious risks but little or no outrage? That is, until recently, and mainly among young people. read more…

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