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Global Development Institute Blog

Critical visions of development from the Global Development Institute: Uniting the strengths of IDPM and BWPI.

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A Climate Resilient Approach to Social Protection

A Climate Resilient Approach to Social Protection

Dr Joanne C. Jordan, Global Development Institute, University of Manchester, UK

Climate change is one of the biggest environmental and development challenges of the 21st century. But we will not all face this challenge in the same way, as the impacts of climate change are unevenly distributed; people that are marginalised in society are especially vulnerable to climate change because of intersecting social processes that create multidimensional inequalities.

Climate change and the inequalities in its impact are a key challenge for social protection programmes aimed at combating extreme poverty in the Global South. Climate change is likely to intensify the types of risks that those enrolled in social protection programmes will experience in the future.

However, there are few projects that integrate both climate change resilience and social protection objectives, despite both aiming to reduce the risks experienced by vulnerable people. Later this year I will carry out research examining what the ‘Infrastructure for Climate Resilient Growth in India’s  (ICRG) experience can tell us about the effects of building a climate resilient social protection approach in Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Scheme (MGNREGS) and other public works programmes.

  read more…

Listen: Sally Cawood discusses domestic violence in Bangladesh

Listen: Sally Cawood discusses domestic violence in Bangladesh

Sally Cawood, PhD researcher at the Global Development Institute discusses domestic violence in the slums of Bangladesh in our latest podcast.

 

Note: This article gives the views of the author/academic featured and does not represent the views of the Global Development Institute as a whole.
Expulsions: a concept for 21st century global development

Expulsions: a concept for 21st century global development

By Dr Tom Gillespie, Lecturer in Poverty, Inequality & Pro-Poor Politics

Rory Horner and David Hulme’s recent GDI working paper calls for a shift away from the 20th century paradigm of international development, based on the division of the world into Global North (developed) and South (developing), towards a 21st century paradigm of global development, based on a recognition that development issues are universal and cut across this North-South divide. Horner and Hulme’s argument that we need to fundamentally rethink the geography of development resonates with Saskia Sassen’s recent GDI Lecture based on her 2014 book Expulsions. In her hugely engaging lecture, Sassen lamented the tendency in the social sciences to create insular silos of knowledge and focus on rarefied disciplinary debates. In order to understand contemporary social and economic transformations, she argued, we must identify the common dynamics that connect apparently unrelated phenomena. The book does this by exploring the “subterranean trends” (Sassen, 2014, p.5) that cut across familiar distinctions, such as Global North and South, and connect a diversity of issues including austerity in Europe, mass incarceration in the United States, corporate land grabs in Africa and environmental destruction globally. Sassen concludes that the common dynamic that connects these issues is one of ‘expulsion’: whereas post-war capitalism was characterised by the inclusion of people as workers and consumers, capitalism since the 1980s has been increasingly characterised by the extraction of profits and the expulsion of unwanted people and places from the economy. read more…

Hamza Arsbi on making a difference through his social enterprise in Jordan

Hamza Arsbi on making a difference through his social enterprise in Jordan

By Hamza Arsbi, who is currently studying at the Global Development Institute for an MSc in International Development.

This month, The University of Manchester honoured a group of students, alumni, and staff at the Making a Difference Awards for the amazing work being done across the University on social development projects. I received the Outstanding Contribution to Social Enterprise award for my organisation, the Science League, an initiative with the mission to increase access to education and provide students with the skills needed for the 21st century.

I started the Science League with a group of my friends while I was completing my Bachelor’s degree at the University of Jordan in 2012. It came out of a personal frustration with how the educational system failed to equip me with skills to face real world problems. As a result I decided to create educational programs to show children a different perspective and a nuanced view of life through science. read more…

The Global Development Institute is Hiring

The Global Development Institute is Hiring

We have big ambitions at the GDI and to make them happen, we need the best research and teaching staff.  If you have an outstanding track record and a commitment to social justice, then please come and join us.

Click on the job titles for more information:

 

Senior Lecturer in Agrarian Change and Food Security

Permanent from September 2017. Closing date: 30/06/2017

 

Senior Lecturer in Environment and Climate Change

Permanent from September 2017. Closing date: 30/06/2017

 

Senior Lecturer in Urban Development and Urban Transformation

Permanent from September 2017. Closing date: 30/06/2017

 

Senior Lecturer in Technology, Labour and Sustainable Global Production

Permanent from September 2017. Closing date: 30/06/2017

The segmented globalisation practices within India’s pharmaceutical industry

The segmented globalisation practices within India’s pharmaceutical industry

By Dr Rory Horner, Lecturer in Globalisation and Political Economy

In a new paper published in Global Networks, Rory Horner and Jim Murphy argue that significant discontinuities are present between the business practices Indian pharmaceutical firms deploy in South-South production networks vs. those in South-North trade.

The geography of global trade is shifting rapidly, with actors in the global South playing much more prominent roles as both producers and consumers in global trade. South-South trade has expanded rapidly, yet South-South value chains and production networks have received less attention than North-South oriented value chains to date.

India’s pharmaceutical supply, often termed the “pharmacy of the developing world”, is one of the most crucial, and fascinating, examples of South-South trade. More than 50% of India’s pharmaceutical exports by revenue, and even more by volume, go to other countries in the global South. They are significant economically, but perhaps even more importantly for public health – having the potential to increase access to medicines through relatively low-cost generics. Yet, although it is well-known that large volumes of pharmaceuticals are exported from India, relatively less is known about the underlying supply chains.

read more…

Students learn lessons from Manchester NGOs

Students learn lessons from Manchester NGOs

Dr Jane Cocking

Dr Jane Cocking

On Thursday, 25th May students from the Global Development Institute had an unique opportunity to work with leading members of two of Manchester’s major NGOs. Students on the masters programmes in Management and Implementation of Development Projects,  Organisational Change and Development and  Development Management engaged in information exchange and workshop activities with representatives from MAG and RETRAK.

Dr Jane Cocking, CEO of MAG, spoke about the work and challenges of this world-leading NGO and their efforts to eradicate the threat of anti-personnel landmines. The NGO, which won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1997, is the largest NGO in Manchester and this provided an excellent opportunity for students to learn about the management of a large organisation. Jane also presented a real life scenario relating to this NGO’s management to our students which they tackled effectively.

read more…

Diana Mitlin on co-producing sustainable cities

Diana Mitlin on co-producing sustainable cities

Professor Diana Mitlin has appeared as part of the UN-Habitat’s Global Urban Lecture series arguing that coproduction is an essential component of an inclusive urban agenda.

UN-Habitat’s Global Urban Lecture series collect and share knowledge related to the New Urban Agenda through free 15 minute video lectures by urban experts associated with the work of UN-Habitat . The series documents knowledge and experience on all UN-Habitat priorities, and reaches out to a new generation of urban professionals who will soon be the ones taking crucial positions in the makings of our future cities. read more…

Fire risk reduction in informal settlements: interrogating evidence, imagining solutions

Fire risk reduction in informal settlements: interrogating evidence, imagining solutions

Laura Hirst is working on an ESRC CASE PhD studentship with Operation Florian at the Global Development Institute, University of Manchester, researching the production of vulnerability to fire risk in resource poor urban settlements in the Global South. She is about to commence her fieldwork in different urban settlements in Nairobi, Kenya.

The immediate aftermath of a tent fire in an informal refugee settlement in Zahle, Beqaa Valley, Lebanon

Medair staff conducting household visits as part of a fire risk training at an informal refugee settlement in Taanayel, Beqaa Valley, Lebanon.
Photo credit: Laura Hirst and Steve Jordan.

Workshop organised by the Manchester Migration Lab and Operation Florian, 27 April 2017

Fires cause over 300,000 deaths annually worldwide, causing permanent injuries to millions more, with the vast majority occurring in low and middle income countries. However, these figures are likely to be a vast underestimate; fire risk is classed as extensive – meaning it is everyday, localised, and high frequency – and is less likely to be documented and managed than intensive risks. Fires in informal urban settlements are even less likely to be officially recorded, due to a combination of issues related to poverty and spatial, social, economic and political marginalisation. Similarly, the impact of fire risk on lives and wellbeing beyond physical injuries can be extensive but difficult to quantify; long term health, livelihoods, housing and well-being at different levels may be severely jeopardised, compounding existing disadvantages often experienced by residents of informal settlements. read more…

The Call for a New Deal- Conversing with Dr. Richard-Kozul Wright (Director, UNCTAD)

The Call for a New Deal- Conversing with Dr. Richard-Kozul Wright (Director, UNCTAD)

By Karishma Banga, PhD researcher at the Global Development Institute  

We have been living in what Richard Kozul-Wright deems as the ‘Age of Anxiety’, with developing economies suffering from post-traumatic crash disorder, advanced economies finding it difficult to recover from the crisis and growing risks for everybody, everywhere. This comes on top of 30 years of hyper-globalisation, precarious work, rising levels of debt and inequality and- the cherry on the cake- ruthless corporations. Raising fingers at the bleakness of the current scenario, we have proponents pushing forward the mantra of ‘Inclusiveness for All’. While these words sound good to our ears, we continue to witness a slow-down of growth in the global economy. read more…

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